Scatter Brain


stuartashen:

IDEAS MEN | S2E2 | Solving Youth Unemployment


Via ashens.com


mothernaturenetwork:

Using chemistry to make otherworldly art
Artist Iori Tomita explores the natural art of the skeletal system by exploiting clever chemistry tricks.


Via Mother Nature Network


thisistheverge:

A history of metaphors for the internet
the internet is like a series of tubes, clouds, a stream, a town square, and so much more



thisistheverge:

Compare concept art from your favorite movies and games to the real thing
From the jaegers of ‘Pacific Rim’ to the post-apocalyptic beauty of ‘The Last of Us’


Sadly, if it was once difficult to conceive of people capable of such unfathomable cruelty, it is no longer. Yesterday’s guerrillas have given way to terrorists, and now terrorists have given way to this new band, who are something like serial killers. ISIS, an organization of thugs, is the Middle East’s answer to the psycho-killer narco gang Los Zetas, trying to out-bad their enemies, to frighten them into submission, and to somehow draw themselves into an ugly cartoon of evil.

Jon Lee Anderson on the men who killed James Foley. (via newyorker) Via The New Yorker



mothernaturenetwork:

Yoga guru BKS Iyengar dies at 95
The Indian legend is largely credited with bringing yoga to the West.



cinephiliabeyond:

Out-of-print Criterion LaserDisc/DVD audio commentary for The Silence of the Lambs by Jonathan Demme, Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Ted Tally, and FBI agent John Douglas: “It’s a crying shame that this excellent commentary is no longer available. It’s an almost perfect example of the multi-participant track: each of the five participants has something to bring to the table. They all treat the film and subject with respect and therefore have things to say that go well beyond the movie. The FBI guy gives credibility to the track and gives his comments on capital punishment and the thoughts that go through the heads of serial killers. Nothing on this track is redundant, the pace and voices are perfect. And let this commentary be a lesson to other commentators. Just talking for two hours doesn’t make it good. You have to have something to say. And they certainly do here. Outstanding!” RateThatCommentary

Academy Award-winning screenwriter Ted Tally gives a provocative look at the adaptation and production of the Oscar-winning film The Silence of the Lambs. Tally covers it all: working with director Jonathan Demme, anticipating Jodie Foster’s Oscar win, the delicious changed ending for the world’s most famous cannibal, Hannibal Lecter, and more.

It’s a constant mind game that you’re playing with the audience, a game of trying to anticipate their expectations and surprise them. Jonathan Demme says, ‘It’s better to confuse the audience for a couple of minutes than to bore them for a couple of seconds.’ You always want to be a little ahead of them, but not so far ahead of them that it seems snarky. —Ted Tally

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Ted Tally’s screenplay for The Silence of the Lambs  [Wisconsin Screenwriters Forum, pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

Hello. The party you have called is unavailable at the moment. This is Anthony Hopkins, or Hannibal Lecter, if you prefer. I would be very happy to take your message. In fact, I insist. When the last person who failed to do so, I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chainti. So please, leave your name and number after the beep. Oh… and pleasant dreams, by the way. —Anthony “Hannibal” Hopkins in one of the strangest bits of promotional material available

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:


Via Cinephilia and Beyond


mothernaturenetwork:

Recipe: World’s Best Vegan Guacamole
The trick to this guac is all in the preparation.



mothernaturenetwork:

Kids’ drawings may paint a picture of later intelligence
Researchers ranked a child’s drawing of a person based on whether or not the picture included a head, a body, and facial features.



cinephiliabeyond:

The Captivus, a sci-fi short film from the workshop of Casey Tebo, a Boston-area filmmaker who spent years filming Aerosmith concerts and videos, is a clever story with an intelligent twist set in a spaceship made entirely out of scrap material. In less than fifteen minutes, Casey clearly demonstrates his talents in both filmmaking and storytelling, creating a believable environment enriched with numerous original details and spicing it up with an ending that puts all of the pieces together. Two thumbs up for the vision and execution!

I grew up outside Boston, and since I was very small, made home movies with friends on a SONY handy-cam. I even staged a production of Return of the Jedi in 3rd grade (true story.) When I got into my 20s, I did the responsible thing, and got a job as a graphic designer, and did pretty well, so I never followed through with my dreams of being a director, I didn’t think that was something you could do living in Boston. There’s not many jobs! But I met Steven Tyler from Aerosmith in 2006 and lied my way into editing a DVD. That was when he kind of pulled me aside and said “you need to be directing movies and music videos!” so he took me on the road to film Aerosmiths shows, and it snowballed into other jobs for them, including a theatrical concert film entitled Rock for the Rising Sun — a film I basically shot and editied on my own, without telling anyone, and the film ended up in theatres (for a small run!)

After working so much for Steven, he urged me to do The Captivus. Which leads me to:

THE CAPTIVUS!

Sci-Fi is my favorite genre, my daughter’s name is Ripley (Aliens) and my son’s Dutch (predator), ha! And I was tired of the same run-of-the-mill sci-fi, with flashy graphics, and sqeaky clean space suits (this is why I loved DISTRICT 9) so I wanted to deconstruct that a bit. I was always a huge fan of Hitchcock and The Twilight Zone, things like amazing stories, so I wanted to make a short that was my tip of the hat to material like that. I wanted things broken, old, dirty, I wanted it to look used, and I didn’t have any money! So, what better way, then to use stuff from the dump! EVERYTHING inside that spaceship, cables, old hospital equipment, is from the Boston city dump. I wanted all the ship’s graphics to look archaic, so I did everything in Final Cut Pro, then exported each frame through an action in Adobe Photoshop that made it look 8-bit, I think it’s really cool.

I feel like the editing could be better, because I edited it myself, and I’m not an editor, but I wrote it, directed it, did the production design, all the FX, and I’m really proud of it. And people seem to love it!

It definitely helped me get financing for my first feature, HAPPY BIRTHDAY. When I met with Vannessa Lengies (Waiting, Stick It), she said she didn’t need to meet me, she wanted to do HAPPY BIRTHDAY because she loved THE CAPTIVUS so much, so that was nice to hear!

It played at a bunch of festivals, and got some fans online like Seth Green, Zachary Levi, and more. Casey Tebo

Contact
Casey Tebo on Vimeo
Follow Casey Tebo on Twitter

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:


Via Cinephilia and Beyond


newyorker:

Stefan Merill Block reviews Matthew Thomas’s fictional account of dementia:

"While this marvellous novel resists a glibly humanizing attempt to imagine what lies ‘beyond words,’ the need to imagine remains. For all its insight, Thomas’s novel ends with the old question unanswered. If ‘we are not ourselves’ in the depths of Alzheimer’s, who are we?" 

Illustration by Wesley Allsbrook




mothernaturenetwork:

14 of the most striking crater lakes on Earth
While a few of these natural wonders formed as a result of meteors raining down through our atmosphere, many more were skillfully crafted by the volcanic hands of our own Mother Earth. From the active hotspots of Iceland and Indonesia to the now-extinct volcanic relics of millennia long past, these dramatic depressions provide an invaluable peek into the geological history of our planet.


Via Mother Nature Network


thisistheverge:

The best tablet you can buy
Welcome to the post-PC era


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